Is the Pandemic Making Young People Think About Estate Planning?

McNair Dallas Law

Younger people estate planning

Caring.com, a leading senior living referral service and the nation's top site for senior care reviews, has published a comprehensive report from its annual Wills and Estate Planning Study.

A 2021 study from caring.com shows revealed that more young people are thinking about completing their estate planning.  The coronavirus pandemic has had an impact on viewpoints among young people and other specific groups.  The survey generated responses from 2,500 Americans and is a continuing effort to create greater awareness and understanding about the estate planning process.

Insurance News Net’s recent article entitled “Study: Young Adults More Likely To Do Estate Planning Due To COVID-19” reports that, based on results from last year, the number of young adults with a will increased by 63%.

For the first time, adults under 35 are more likely to have a will than those ages 35-54. About 50% of all younger adults surveyed also said that COVID-19 prompted their interest in estate planning. Despite the growing interest among younger adults, most Americans still do not have a will. They fail to take any action, except for speaking to loved ones about estate planning. About ⅔ or 67% overall still don’t have a will.

Most of those who responded to the survey said that procrastination was the main reason for not having a will. However, the number of Americans who expressed a lack of understanding increased by 90% since 2017.

The survey also shows a significant increase among Hispanic and Black Americans with a will. The number of Hispanics with a will increased by 12% and by 6.2% among Blacks, since the 2020 report.

“In comparison to previous years, the 2021 study indicates that Americans see a greater need for estate planning due to the pandemic,” says caring.com CEO, Jim Rosenthal. “Unfortunately, many people haven’t begun the estate planning process – even with the increased availability of remote and online services.”

Income level is also a significant factor among people who do in estate planning. The survey’s respondents making under $40,000 a year were less likely to have a will.

The percentage of Americans with a will and annual income of $40,000 to $80,000 increased 6% to 39% in one year.

Caring.com has conducted its Wills and Estate Planning Study since 2015 to raise awareness of the importance of estate planning, especially among people who may not feel they have the money or know-how needed to create a will or living trust.  An elder law estate planning attorney can help individuals complete their estate planning, regardless of their age.

Reference: Insurance News Net (Feb. 23, 2021) “Study: Young Adults More Likely To Do Estate Planning Due To COVID-19”

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